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Aspects of Aging

Retirement and Aging Gracefully

 
New York Times
March 2016
 
Several wide-ranging retirement articles, including health care, Medicare, post-retirement careers and entrepreneurship, fraud against the elderly, veterans benefits, investments and finances, trusts and more.
 

New York Times
March 7, 2014
 
The aging population is spurring new fields and job openings for those in their 50s to 70s to care for those who are 80 and older.   Many older Americans not only change occupations, but in large numbers they also transition from wage-and-salary employment into self-employment.  One increasingly popular niche for those who want to be their own boss is job
 

New York Times
March 12, 2014
 
Since ancient times, the elusive concept of wisdom has figured prominently in philosophical and religious texts. The question remains compelling: What is wisdom, and how does it play out in individual lives? Most psychologists agree that if you define wisdom as maintaining positive well-being and kindness in the face of challenges, it is one of the most important qualities one can possess to age successfully — and to face physical decline and death.


New York Times
January 3, 2015
There is liberation: old people simply care less about what others think, but also that our sense of what’s important grows with age. We experience life more intensely than before, whatever our physical limitations, because we know it won’t last forever. How to enable the growing numbers of old people to live comfortable, meaningful lives is a fundamental issue of equality, with benefits for all. If we make the world better for old people, we make it better for everyone, from stroller-pushers to wheelchair-users.
  
New York Times
April 3, 2015 
For many, a retirement of babysitting grandchildren, golfing and relaxing on the beach is passé. Older people today approach work as a pillar of a retirement lifestyle, planning ahead and adding skills even before leaving their current jobs.  As demand for more adult learning opportunities accelerates, colleges and universities are trying to figure out how to tap into the market for second careers to bolster their revenue and perhaps build alumni loyalty. The potential audience is huge. 

New York Times
April 10, 2015
 
Should you downsize and move to a new neighborhood? Or renovate the family residence to suit your retirement needs and lock in for the long term? It is one of the most vexing questions older people face as they plan the shift from a working life to retirement. Many people think that they would be better off updating their existing home and staying put. “We might not even get the money out dollar for dollar,” said one, but “We’ll get the living out of it. You can’t put a price on comfort.”


PBS
November 20, 2015
A growing body of research suggests that creativity and artistic expression contribute to healthy aging. Creativity is linked to decreased stress, better cognitive health, self-acceptance and a sense of purpose. Gay Hanna, executive director of the National Center for Creative Aging, observes that “art is spiritual and its community building. Co-housing with like-minded people makes it easier to pursue individual interests. “Aging in place and age-friendly communities are going to make it more conducive for these informal groupings of artists and interest groups to form.”  
 

New York Times
April 15, 2015

Exercise has had a Goldilocks problem, with experts debating just how much exercise is too little, too much or just the right amount to improve health and longevity. Two new, impressively large-scale studies provide some clarity, suggesting that the ideal dose of exercise for a long life is a bit more than many of us currently believe we should get, but less than many of us might expect. The studies also found that prolonged or intense exercise is unlikely to be harmful and could add years to people’s lives.  No one doubts, of course, that any amount of exercise is better than none. Like medicine, exercise is known to reduce risks for many diseases and premature death.

 

New York Times
March 12, 2016
INTIMIDATED by digital technology? So was Marian Goldberg, 70, until she went to a  class, which teaches older adults how to become more comfortable being online. For example, apps can help you. Pillboxie uses color coding and simple menus to help older people remember to take their medications. EyeReader turns a smartphone into a magnifying glass. And the Silver Surf app was designed for people over 50 to read small print with zoom control. Many more apps are available for your use.
 

New York Times
February 27, 2016

Is it possible to have it all in retirement? That’s what so-called continuing care retirement communities promise. These hybrids offer independent living apartments (and sometimes free-standing cottages) along with assisted-living support, home care, a nursing home and often specialized memory care, all within one complex. The idea is for a resident to “age in place” and obtain additional services as that person becomes more frail and dependent, without having to move.

New York Times
January 26, 2015
Geriatrics is one of the few medical specialties in the United States that is contracting even as the need increases.
New York Times
March 7, 2016
Throughout the country, the arts are pumping new life into the bodies and minds of the elderly. (Ed: see ViV Events) 
Washington Post
January 23, 2016

“I have a confession to make,” Bill Thomas announced several months ago at a conference on aging in Oregon. “I am an old man.” 

“No, you’re not!” an audience member called out. It was meant, no doubt, as a compliment: Despite his gray-streaked beard and crow’s feet, the 56-year-old geriatrician-cum-thespian crackles with high-octane energy. And isn’t that what we all want to hear as we age? That we don’t look old? That we seem younger than we are?

It’s not what Thomas wants to hear. After more than 20 years of trying to make life better for old people, he believes the correct message is the opposite: That we are lucky if we get to grow old. That there is a “third” phase of life beyond adulthood that can be as rich as either of the phases that came before.


Multigenerational Homes That Fit Just Right
New York Times
April 9, 2016

The number of Americans living in multigenerational households — defined, generally, as homes with more than one adult generation — rose to 56.8 million in 2012, or about 18.1 percent of the total population, from 46.6 million, or 15.5 percent of the population in 2007, according to the latest data from Pew Research. By comparison, an estimated 28 million, or 12 percent, lived in such households in 1980. “People lost jobs, and with tighter household budgets, a lot of homes consolidated,” said Aaron Terrazas, a senior economist at Zillow, the home pricing website. “We’re seeing more children living with their parents and elderly parents moving in with their adult children.”


A Second Look at a ‘Misconception’ on Exercise and Bones

New York Times
April 22, 2016


Clarifying misconceptions of the link between weight bearing exercise and adult bone strength.


New York Times
August 6, 2016
The law requires notification to Medicare beneficiaries that they may incur huge out-of-pocket costs if they seek care at nursing homes after not being formally admitted to hospitals as inpatients. A new law reqires hospitals to notify patients that they may incur huge out-of-pocket costs if they stay more than 24 hours without being formally admitted. Because of the notice act, passed by congress in 2015 with broad bipartisan support, patients can expect to start receiving the warnings in January, 2017.

New York Times
July 22, 2016

Moving is stressful at any age, but for those who have lived in one place for many years, getting rid of things that have accumulated over decades is a large barrier to overcome. As people get older, said David J. Ekerdt, a professor of sociology and gerontology at the University of Kansas, cognitive and physical issues hamper divestment.  “It’s also a very emotional task. It’s hard to quantify the attachment one has to certain possessions,” he said, adding that the probability of people divesting themselves of their belongings decreases each decade after age 50. Read this article, but also note that MovingEZ, a local company, is listed in our Contractors' list. Jenny and her staff readily use efficiency and good humor in helping people move. 


New York Times

September 23, 2016

Estate sales are a step up from tag sales with the promise of nicer items, the potential for rare finds and an expert to curate it all. But they exist in an unregulated market in which an agent's average fees are 35-40 per cent of the sale total.

As Their Numbers Grow, Home Care Aides Are Stuck at $10.11
New York Times
September 23, 2016
That’s the median hourly wage for the workers, mostly minority women, caring for older adults. Not surprisingly, the annual turnover rate is 40 percent to 60 percent.

New York Times

September 20, 2016

Working families in the United States have many struggles today: expensive child care, not enough time to cook healthy meals, disconnection from nature, a sense of social isolation--what the sociologist, Robert Putnam, famously called "bowling alone"-- and more older Americans, a booming population, often end up segregated generationally and in dire need of care and companionship.


www.cnn.com
May 15, 2016
Nearly one-quarter of Americans 65 and older could become "elder orphans" with no family to help care for them. Approximately one-third of Americans 45 to 63 years of age are single. There are not enough nursing homes and facilities to care for the growing number of seniors who are on their own.
 

Kiplinger
September 2016

When I look at my retirement stash, I have to admit it's kind of small. When I look at my house,I realize it's kind of big. and when I consider the two together, I think that maybe I should downsize and use the equity in my house to buy a condo or add to my retirement savings and rent.

Home Renovation for the Golden Years
New York Times
December 30, 2016

There are many things you can do to make your home continue to work as you age. For practical advice, see Tips for Creating a Home for Aging Owners


Next Avenue: News and Information for People Over 50

Website of an organization providing articles on a wide variety of aging-related topics, as well as links to related news sources. Constantly updated.


Warning to Retirees Who Take Up Music: The Cat May Flee the Room
New York Times
January 27, 2017

Many retirees take up musical instruments they played as youngsters, or start playing for the first time. Reactions of others in the house isn't always positive, but the effect on the musician always is.


A Housing Crisis for Seniors
New York Times
January 28, 2017

The senior population is growing rapidly in the suburbs, where suitable housing, transportation and other services are not generally available. The problem needs to be addressed soon.


Generation Us: Simple Strategies Make Cooking for One Easy and Enjoyable
Daily Progress (Charlottesville, VA)
February 16, 2017

Recognize that food preparation for one or two is a different stage of life, resulting in an adjustment in the kitchen. But there are easy ways to continue to nourish your body without a health compromise. 


Easy Fixes Can Make a Home Safer for Seniors
Albuquerque Journal 
February 19, 2017

Practical suggestions of things to do to make your home safer.


How to Find Your Missing Keys and Stop Losing Other Things
New York Times
April 3, 2017

Everybody forgets where they've put things. Here are tips for searching, and things to do so you don't have to search.


To Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year Old
New York Times
April 7, 2017

Profile of Dr. John Goodenough who, with a team from the University of Texas, Austin, just filed for his latest patent on a lightweight battery that could revolutionize things like electric cars. He's 94. At 57, he was co-inventor of the lithium-ion battery. Many younger people insist that old people can't be creative or inventive. Don't listen.


Moving to Be Near the Grandkids
Kiplinger's Personal Finance
May 2017

Things to consider before relocating to be near family.


More Older Couples Are "Shacking Up'
New York Times
May 8, 2017

Living together, without marrying, used to be something for younger people. For a variety of reasons, seniors are doing it too.


Use Your Phone as a Digital Magnifying Glass
New York Times
May 16, 2017

You can download an app, but there are also features built into smartphones that can use the camera as a magnifier. So you can read that menu even if you forgot your reading glasses.


Baby Boomers Look to Senior Concierge Services to Raise Income
New York Times
May 19, 2017

Senior concierge services, where older people pay for assistance with daily activities like shopping, reading aloud, or company, are a new employment opportunity for baby boomers. As the article points out, the Village movement provides many of these services for a much lower cost (full membership).


"No One Wants to Be Old": How to Put the "Non-age" in Nonagenarian
Kaiser Health News
June 26, 2017

Advice from folks in their 80s and 90s on how to remain active and younger feeling. 


Hire Women Your Mom's Age
New York Times
August 5, 2017

Older women, who may have taken time off to care for family, are penalized when they seek a new job. They bring a lot of skills but may be overlooked by employers.


Writing the Script for Your Next Act
New York Times
August 4, 2017

As they approach retirement age, many people are experimenting with options for what comes next.


Graying of the Suburbs Presents Challenges for the Community
Daily Progress (Charlottesville, VA)
August 10, 2017

A rapidly growing percentage of those who live in the suburbs are seniors. The privacy and space they sought when they were younger now pose dangers. And the lack of public transportation isolates them further. Public officials are just beginning to grapple with the issue.


What Happens to Creativity as We Age?
New York Times
August 19, 2017 

Report of a recent experiment to study how creative thinking and problem solving change with age. It turns out there are two ways of thinking: exploration and exploitation. Adults exploit acquired knowledge to solve a new problem using known solutions. Children and adolescents explore, trying "crazy" possibilities that may or may not work.


Aging Parents With Lots of Stuff, and Children Who Don't Want It
New York Times
August 18, 2017

What happens when seniors downsize and their kids don't want the china and crystal? There's a growing demand for companies who specialize in downsizing and relocation services.


Many Now Spending Retirement Years Caring for Elderly Parents
Daily Progress (Charlottesville, VA)
September 7, 2017

As the number of "old old" grows, their retired children are facing new responsibilities in caring for them. The financial and physical burdens are real.


Feeling Older? Here's How to Embrace It
New York Times
September 12, 2017

Feeling old is as much a state of mind as of years or even physical limitations. You can feel old at 30 or young at 80.


Safer Cars Help Keep Older Drivers on the Road
New York Times
August 28, 2017

Safety features on new cars - rear cameras, lane departure warnings, collision avoidance - make it easier for older drivers to stay mobile. Technology helps compensate for slower reaction times, loss of visual acuity, and other age-related issues.


5 Signs You Retired Too Early
CNN Money
September 12, 2017

For some, retirement is too tempting to resist. And then they discover that it was the wrong decision. You can recognize the symptoms and return to the workforce if you made the wrong decision.







 
 
 

Her mother, who taught in a one-room schoolhouse in the hills of Kentucky a century ago, had some words of wisdom for Adna Bert Baldwin: A woman should be independent and have money to pay her own way.

 

Ms. Baldwin, 81, took that advice seriously. She married young, to her high school sweetheart, but followed in her mother’s footsteps, teaching elementary school students not far from Cincinnati for 27 years. The pension she earned when she retired two decades ago left her more secure than her mother, Adna Burns, who taught in an era when the idea of paid retirement was just emerging for teachers.

Her mother, who taught in a one-room schoolhouse in the hills of Kentucky a century ago, had some words of wisdom for Adna Bert Baldwin: A woman should be independent and have money to pay her own way.

 

Ms. Baldwin, 81, took that advice seriously. She married young, to her high school sweetheart, but followed in her mother’s footsteps, teaching elementary school students not far from Cincinnati for 27 years. The pension she earned when she retired two decades ago left her more secure than her mother, Adna Burns, who taught in an era when the idea of paid retirement was just emerging for teachers.

Her mother, who taught in a one-room schoolhouse in the hills of Kentucky a century ago, had some words of wisdom for Adna Bert Baldwin: A woman should be independent and have money to pay her own way.

 

Ms. Baldwin, 81, took that advice seriously. She married young, to her high school sweetheart, but followed in her mother’s footsteps, teaching elementary school students not far from Cincinnati for 27 years. The pension she earned when she retired two decades ago left her more secure than her mother, Adna Burns, who taught in an era when the idea of paid retirement was just emerging for teachers.

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